problackgirl:

we’ve taught girls to romanticise nearly everything a boy does. when i was younger i thought it was cute that boys chased the girl even after she said no. i loved it when after a girl moved away from a kiss, the guy would pull her back and force it on. i thought a guy saying ‘i won’t take a no for an answer’ was passionate and romantic. we’re literally always teaching girls to romanticise abusive traits.

Anonymous asked:
could you maybe explain the drag queen thing i dont get it im sorry

chrysalisamidst:

poppunkvampire:

drag queens often perform incredibly catty misogynistic stereotypes of womanhood and use a huge amount of misogynistic slurs and transmisogynistic slurs. it’s also incredibly common for drag circles to excuse or actively engage in racism, see Shirley Q Liquor, who wears actual blackface onstage (which RuPaul defended publicly and insisted wasn’t racist). and when RuPaul’s Drag Race was called out by the trans community for frequently using transmisogynistic slurs and then designing a game on the show where the goal was literally to “clock” trans women, the drag community rose to defend him, and he got away with a weak-ass fauxpology. additonally, drag is a performance, so the performers can shed womanhood (particularly the dangerous territory of DMAB womanhood) at will, and do not actually experience misogyny or transmisogyny in any real way. drag culture also often blurs the lines between drag and non-cis genders as a way of excusing transmisogyny, which perpetuates attitudes in queer communities that non-cis genders are performative and therefore to be judged on how “well” they are performed. this often makes cis queer spaces very uncomfortable for trans people; people will openly clock you and comment on your ability to “pass”. I have no problem with drag as a gender expression, or with DMAB people who express femininity, but I have a huge fucking problem with drag culture.

FUCKING THIS. 


oinkaloink:

'no homo' god says as he puts the male g-spot up their anus

Half of seeming clever is keeping your mouth shut at the right times.
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man’s Fear (via purplebuddhaproject)

problackgirl:

we’ve taught girls to romanticise nearly everything a boy does. when i was younger i thought it was cute that boys chased the girl even after she said no. i loved it when after a girl moved away from a kiss, the guy would pull her back and force it on. i thought a guy saying ‘i won’t take a no for an answer’ was passionate and romantic. we’re literally always teaching girls to romanticise abusive traits.

I am thankful for my struggle because without it, I wouldn’t have stumbled upon my strength.
Alexandra Elle (via purplebuddhaproject)
I like being myself, but only when I’m scattered and various and gregarious.
Virginia Woolf, from Selected Diaries (via violentwavesofemotion)

Stop telling women that we should find ourselves beautiful and that we should love ourselves when you are standing right there, judging us on how our knees look in short skirts and how prominent our boobs are in a sweater and how much makeup we are or are not wearing.

Instead of us working harder on “love your body” and “find your inner beauty”, the rest of the world should be working harder on “stop telling women their bodies are a shameful place to live but that if they’re strong enough, they will learn to embrace that shame.”

This is my body. It’s not “beautiful”. I don’t “love it”. I don’t have to. I don’t have to have any strong feelings about my body. And whatever feelings I do have are not somehow invalid if they’re not glowing reviews.


Elyse Mofo, “Don’t Tell Me to Love My Body” (via nightrevelations)

micdotcom:

7 ways white people can combat their privilege

It’s important for everyone to begin thinking and behaving in ways that relinquish white privilege and white supremacy when it noticeably impacts daily life. Because it’s not about admitting it anymore. It’s about giving it up. Here’s a few ways how that can happen.

What you can do in public | Follow micdotcom